Montreal Completement Cirque Reviews

The Elephant in the Room. Cirque Le Roux. Photo Francesca Torracchi The Elephant in the Room. Cirque Le Roux. Photo Francesca Torracchi

The Elephant in the Room

The Elephant in the Room. Cirque Le Roux. Photo Frank W. Ockenfels

The Elephant in the Room. Cirque Le Roux. Photo Frank W. Ockenfels

The Elephant in the Room is the first show presented by Cirque Le Roux, a troupe of four members. The story is set in a 1930s lounge room where a bride appears and laughs mischievously.

This show is part circus, part theatre and part dance. Everything is remarkable from the storyline where we quickly learn Miss Betty is plotting something diabolical against her husband in an attempt to get attention while being disrupted by an American dandy and the ridiculous but hilarious butler Bouffon.

The Elephant in the Room. Photo Francesca Torracchi.

The Elephant in the Room. Photo Francesca Torracchi.

The acrobatics are out of this world with the giant pole, which made people uneasy. The dancing numbers are fun with some tap dancing. It almost feels like a broadway show minus the singing and with breathtaking acrobatics.

For 75 minutes, the show transports you in a different world filled with surprises, laughs and gasps. A show to watch if you love old Hollywood film noir genre.

Cirque Le Roux’s first show is a success and possibly the most entertaining from Montréal Complètement Cirque lineup of shows.

Pour Le Meilleur et Pour Le Pire

Pour le Meilleur et Pour Le PIre. Cirque Aital.

Pour le Meilleur et Pour Le PIre. Cirque Aital.

Cirque Aïtal from France presented Pour le meilleur et pour le pire, a cute and romantic circus act where we follow the adventures of a couple on the road. Their red clown car is full of surprises and often breaks down to the displeasure of the couple that in between fixing it are doing acrobatics and mesmerizing hand-to-hand acts. The petite Finn seems to be light as a feather when the tall French throws and catches her mid-way. There was a lot of gasping during the throws and aerial acts. Kati Pikkarainen and Victor Cathala are a couple in real life. The show is a glimpse into their circus lives.

The circus tent at TOHU is small and fits around 100 people only. It feels as you stepped in to watch an authentic circus show from the early 20th century. Floor is covered with sand and the benches are small.

Montreal Completement Cirque finished July 17.



Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.